Making Edible Gardens Look Beautiful Year-Round

Recently, Ros received a question from a reader regarding making edible gardens look beautiful year-round. Read on to learn more about Ros’ tips for extending beauty through fall and winter.

Q: I have been growing vegetables in my 125 sq ft back yard for several years. The challenge has been making it look beautiful in the fall and winter.  Does your new book discuss year round gardening? And could you please list the flowers that are pictured in the slide show.

Thank you for sharing, you are an inspiration.

Andrea

A: Hi Andrea,
Yes, I discuss making the garden beautiful all year round. You didn’t say where you live but I find that strong lines created by raised beds, boxwood hedges, and interesting paths helps a lot to give a sense of place. Adding color with containers, painted walls and or gates, and a focal point or two – maybe a trellis, birdbath, or sculpture in a critical juncture holds the viewer’s eye in the space. You might even create a collection of antique garden tools or say Mexican sun faces on the far fence, or even hang a large decorative mirror there. (A mirror makes a small place look larger and is used by designers when there is something nice to reflect in the glass.) And as far as edibles, there are a number that grow well in all but the coldest winter areas including kales, cabbages, leeks, and chard. You can plant them in decorative blocks or diamonds instead of the usual straight rows, or plant them around a birdbath or sundial. Edible Landscaping has many more ideas; these are just to get you started.
I’d love to see photos of your finished creation. If you agree, I could then share it with others.
Thanks for the question,

Ros Creasy

 

Pomegranates, lemons, and persimmons make up my fall harvest.

April 18, 2012 - 7:30 pm

Emmon - The photo above is so rich and wonderful in so many ways — it seems to be telling a story all by itself! I just heard about your from a colleague! Looking forward to learning more about your book!

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